A Very Crafty Saturday

I took these weeks ago, but I’ve gotten so behind with everything that’s going on right now that I’m just glad I get to post these at all.

Saturday’s when both my sister and I can get together and craft are rare, so a few weeks ago we took the opportunity to embark on two projects that had been waiting in the wings.

My love for calligraphy is well documented, (here, here, and right here) but I can barely write in a straight line. So my trusty scribe took a shot at it:

It’s hard. (Or so I’m told).

But produces gorgeous results!

And that was only the beginning! Martha Project number two was printing cards using bits of lace. Neither of us had ever printed in any way shape or form so it was a learning process.

Inking the lace:

We used some very architectural lace. This one reminds me of cathedral windows:

The hardest part of this project was applying enough pressure (and paint) to the lace without moving it while it was on the paper. (I actually did help even though it looks like I just took pictures). 🙂

This lace was my favorite:

Not too bad for a first try! 🙂

Some excellent spring/Easter cards:

Check out the tutorial here. Thanks Martha!

Dance Cards Part II

In case you missed yesterday’s post, Dance Cards Part I, click here.  “Dance cards were used by women starting in the 18th century to record the names of gentlemen she intended to dance with at a formal ball. An actual dance card is typically a booklet with a decorative cover, listing dance titles, composers, and the person with whom the woman intended to dance. Typically, it would have a cover indicating the sponsoring organization of the ball and a decorative cord by which it could be attached to a lady’s wrist or ball gown.”   -Wikipedia

Here are some more dance cards that I’m loving (image credits at the bottom of this post):

From the top:

1909 Mosman District Cricket Club dance card via the Mosman Library

1891 Masquerade dance card via Inside the Gates

1887 Jubilee dance card via the Worcestershire County Council: Croome Collection

Shield dance card via Willow Manor

1874 Shoe dance card via the San Francisco History Center, Book Arts and Special Collections

1847 dance card via Mary Mary Quite Contrary

1884 dance card depicting U.S. presidential candidates via Wikipedia

Dance Cards Part I

Lately I’m feeling very inspired by vintage dance cards. Our good friends at Wikipedia tell me that dance cards were used by women starting in the 18th century to record the names of gentlemen she intended to dance with at a formal ball. An actual dance card is typically a booklet with a decorative cover, listing dance titles, composers, and the person with whom the woman intended to dance. Typically, it would have a cover indicating the sponsoring organization of the ball and a decorative cord by which it could be attached to a lady’s wrist or ball gown.

I’ve found a few from around the web for your viewing pleasure (image credits listed at the bottom of this post):


From the top:

19030s Australian dance card via A Stitch in Time..(This Vintage Life)

1941 Fan dance card via of Lulu’s Vintage

1934 University of South Carolina dance card via The South Caroliniana Archives

1930s School dance cards via Vintagephotosrus

1894 dance card via U.S. Naval Academy Band History

Victorian dance card 1881 Caledonian Club dance card copyright bt  Whimzy Treasures

1902 Icelandic dance card via  Borgarskjalasafn

All imaged by their respective owners.

I love presents!

If I were to write a book about my life, I would call it: “I love presents!” because I do. 🙂 Which is why I was so excited when I received this wonderful package from the lovely Carina of Crow & Canary last week. But I’ve been so busy that I didn’t have time to post about it til now. Check it out:

My sentiments exactly bookmark by Ghost Academy. Gnome card by Owen Says

Happy Birthday card by Egg Press, Beautiful Day card by Cartolina


2010 Calendar by Oddball Press

Check out Crow & Canary for more awesome designs.

Last image by Oddball Press